Spacer Image

This site uses cookies. Learn more about cookies.

OverDrive would like to use cookies to store information on your computer to improve your user experience at our Website. One of the cookies we use is critical for certain aspects of the site to operate and has already been set. You may delete and block all cookies from this site, but this could affect certain features or services of the site. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, click here to see our Privacy Policy.

If you do not wish to continue, please click here to exit this site.

Spacer Image

  Main Nav
Talking to Animals
Cover of Talking to Animals
Talking to Animals
How You Can Understand Animals and They Can Understand You
by Jon Katz
There are so many benefits to learning how to communicate with animals. Love, trust, a spiritual connection that goes to the heart of the human-animal bond. Every time I listen to them, I learn about myself.
We seem to need animals in our disconnected lives more and more, yet we understand them less and less. In Talking to Animals, New York Times bestselling author Jon Katz—who left his Manhattan life behind two decades ago for life on a farm where he is surrounded by dogs, cats, sheep, horses, cows, goats, and chickens—marshals his experience to offer us a deeper insight into animals and the tools needed for effectively communicating with them. By better understanding animal instincts, recognizing they are not mere reflections of our own human emotions and neuroses, we can help them live happily in our shared world.

Devoting each chapter to an animal who has played an important role in his life, Katz tells funny and illuminating stories about his profound experiences with them. He shows us how healthy engagement with animals falls into five key areas: Food, Movement,Visualization, Language, and Instincts. Along the way, we meet Simon the donkey who arrives at Katz's farm near death and now serves as his Tai Chi partner. We meet Red the dog who started out antisocial and untrained and is now a therapy dog working with veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. And we meet Winston, the dignified and brave rooster who was injured defending his hens from a hawk and who has better interpersonal skills than most humans.

Thoughtful and intelligent, lively and heartwarming, this book will completely change the way you think about and interact with animals, building mutual trust and enduring connections.
There are so many benefits to learning how to communicate with animals. Love, trust, a spiritual connection that goes to the heart of the human-animal bond. Every time I listen to them, I learn about myself.
We seem to need animals in our disconnected lives more and more, yet we understand them less and less. In Talking to Animals, New York Times bestselling author Jon Katz—who left his Manhattan life behind two decades ago for life on a farm where he is surrounded by dogs, cats, sheep, horses, cows, goats, and chickens—marshals his experience to offer us a deeper insight into animals and the tools needed for effectively communicating with them. By better understanding animal instincts, recognizing they are not mere reflections of our own human emotions and neuroses, we can help them live happily in our shared world.

Devoting each chapter to an animal who has played an important role in his life, Katz tells funny and illuminating stories about his profound experiences with them. He shows us how healthy engagement with animals falls into five key areas: Food, Movement,Visualization, Language, and Instincts. Along the way, we meet Simon the donkey who arrives at Katz's farm near death and now serves as his Tai Chi partner. We meet Red the dog who started out antisocial and untrained and is now a therapy dog working with veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. And we meet Winston, the dignified and brave rooster who was injured defending his hens from a hawk and who has better interpersonal skills than most humans.

Thoughtful and intelligent, lively and heartwarming, this book will completely change the way you think about and interact with animals, building mutual trust and enduring connections.
Available formats-
  • OverDrive Read
  • EPUB eBook
Subjects-
Languages:-
Copies-
  • Available:
    0
  • Library copies:
    1
Levels-
  • ATOS:
  • Lexile:
  • Interest Level:
  • Text Difficulty:

Recommended for you

About the Author-
  • Jon Katz has written nineteen books—seven novels and twelve works of nonfiction—including The Second Chance Dog: A Love Story and The Dogs of Bedlam Farm. He has written for The New York Times, Slate, Rolling Stone, and Wired. He lives on Bedlam Farm in upstate New York with the artist Maria Wulf; his dogs, Red and Fate; his barn cats, Mother and Minnie; their donkeys, Lulu and Fanny; and ten sheep. Learn more at BedlamFarm.com.
Reviews-
  • Publisher's Weekly

    December 19, 2016
    Bestseller Katz (Saving Simon) fills his latest book with moving essays on what he has learned from different animals. Each story combines biographies of beloved animals with guidance on how humans can better communicate with them, conveying Katz’s message that humans must respect animals for what they are before real connections can be made. To begin a successful relationship, Katz urges readers to “consistently imagine and visualize the behavior seek from dog, and over time, the dog senses it, understands it, and then internalizes it.” Katz’s visualization process, based on the work by animal behaviorist Temple Grandin on how animals perceive the world, comes across as thought-sharing with animals. When Katz has to choose whether to permanently confine Orson, a border collie, or put him down, the communication between the two—and a visualization of Orson by a stream—allows Katz to release Orson. Katz is most successful when relating the sometimes heartbreaking stories of animals or urging readers to consider how animals perceive the world; he’s less skilled at providing concrete tools to learn to better interact with the animals in our own lives.

  • Kirkus

    April 15, 2017
    Forget about ordering your dog to sit. Instead, breathe, imagine, visualize.We're not in the tough-hided world of Temple Grandin here: Katz (Saving Simon: How a Rescue Donkey Taught Me the Meaning of Compassion, 2015, etc.) is a soft-hearted, warm advocate for animals of all kinds, and he's disinclined to use tried-and-true methods of demand and reward. Of one dog, he writes, "I had no commands to give Rose, no words, but I had images and I painted a sketch in my head of what I wanted to happen." That's about as New Age-y as it gets, but it helps explain why just about every town in America now sports a business for pet psychiatrists and animal communicators. It's when the animals start talking back that things get a little weird, as when said dog supposedly remarked, "I can do it, give me a chance to succeed." A little of this goes a long way, and there's a lot of it--a lot of what Katz calls "sweet noise." Still, the author chronicles many affecting encounters with animals, and it is indisputable that, as Katz observes, animals are disappearing from our lives, "vanishing at a horrific rate." For all the tender moments and divinations of body language--a horse with its head down is not fearful but relaxed--the author is capable of righteous fire. When it comes to Bill de Blasio and the ban on carriage horses in New York, circuses, and such, he gets his dander up: "It has become a popular idea in America, this notion that it is cruel for working animals to work with people, exploitive for animals to uplift or entertain people." It seems a curious mix of purposes to want to talk with bunnies on one hand and draft animals on the other, but it's of a piece with Katz's particular brand of advocacy, which has many supporters. Animal lovers with a bent for the woo-woo will enjoy this well-intended but often cloying book.

    COPYRIGHT(2017) Kirkus Reviews, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

  • Library Journal

    May 1, 2017

    Best-selling author Katz (A Good Dog; Izzy &Lenore; Saving Simon) has written another heartfelt book about his deeply personal relationship with animals. He starts with describing his childhood growing up poor in an immigrant neighborhood, being bullied, and experiencing a quarrelsome and abusive family life. His stories about the dogs he encountered in particular will have readers relating to the emotional bonds that develop between human and animal. Katz goes on to discusses attachment theory--the study of the dynamics of long-term relationships and feelings in human beings--and applies this to our relationships with our pets, suggesting that intimate interactions with dogs replay early human emotional development. He states that people generally treat dogs and other pets in one of two ways: the way they were treated as small children, or the way they wish they had been treated. VERDICT Katz has a long and sincere involvement with understanding the human/animal bond; his title is recommended for general audiences. [See Prepub Alert, 11/21/16.]--Edell Marie Schaefer, Brookfield P.L., WI

    Copyright 2017 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission.

Title Information+
  • Publisher
    Atria Books
  • OverDrive Read
    Release date:
  • EPUB eBook
    Release date:
Digital Rights Information+
  • Copyright Protection (DRM) required by the Publisher may be applied to this title to limit or prohibit printing or copying. File sharing or redistribution is prohibited. Your rights to access this material expire at the end of the lending period. Please see Important Notice about Copyrighted Materials for terms applicable to this content.

Status bar:

You've reached your checkout limit.

Visit your Checkouts page to manage your titles.

Close

You already have this title checked out.

Want to go to your Checkouts?

Close

Recommendation Limit Reached.

You've reached the maximum number of titles you can recommend at this time. You can recommend up to 99 titles every 1 day(s).

Close

Sign in to recommend this title.

Recommend your library consider adding this title to the Digital Collection.

Close

Enhanced Details

Close
Close

Limited availability

Availability can change throughout the month based on the library's budget.

is available for days.

Once playback starts, you have hours to view the title.

Close

Permissions

Close

The OverDrive Read format of this eBook has professional narration that plays while you read in your browser. Learn more here.

Close

Holds

Total holds:


Close

Restricted

Some format options have been disabled. You may see additional download options outside of this network.

Close

You've reached your library's checkout limit for digital titles.

To make room for more checkouts, you may be able to return titles from your Checkouts page.

Close

Excessive Checkout Limit Reached.

There have been too many titles checked out and returned by your account within a short period of time.

Try again in several days. If you are still not able to check out titles after 7 days, please contact Support.

Close

You have already checked out this title. To access it, return to your Checkouts page.

Close

This title is not available for your card type. If you think this is an error contact support.

Close

An unexpected error has occurred.

If this problem persists, please contact support.

Close

Close

NOTE: Barnes and Noble® may change this list of devices at any time.

Close
Buy it now
and help our library WIN!
Talking to Animals
Talking to Animals
How You Can Understand Animals and They Can Understand You
Jon Katz
Choose a retail partner below to buy this title for yourself.
A portion of this purchase goes to support your library.
Close
Close

There are no copies of this issue left to borrow. Please try to borrow this title again when a new issue is released.

Close
Barnes & Noble Sign In |   Sign In

You will be prompted to sign into your library account on the next page.

If this is your first time selecting “Send to NOOK,” you will then be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

The first time you select “Send to NOOK,” you will be taken to a Barnes & Noble page to sign into (or create) your NOOK account. You should only have to sign into your NOOK account once to link it to your library account. After this one-time step, periodicals will be automatically sent to your NOOK account when you select "Send to NOOK."

You can read periodicals on any NOOK tablet or in the free NOOK reading app for iOS, Android or Windows 8.

Accept to ContinueCancel